Multimedia Exhibit

Blomquist: The Professor, the Garden, and the Legacy

Celebrating 50 Years of Southeastern Flora at Duke Gardens

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Blomquist Garden of Native Plants with a multimedia exhibit in the Jerry and Bruce Chappell Family Gallery at Duke University's Perkins Library.

This exhibit will introduce Dr. Hugo L. Blomquist, the first professor of botany at Duke University, and the Blomquist Garden, an urban oasis of woodland and sanctuary for more than a thousand species of native flora.

Take a virtual trip to the garden through a short video by Duke student Hunter Stark, featuring a collection of small scenes from the Blomquist Garden. Enjoy the calls of native bird and frog species as you stroll through the gallery.

Spend a few minutes learning about Dr. Blomquist, better known as "Bloomie" to friends and colleagues. Become acquainted with his appreciation for the native plant species of the southeastern United States, particularly the native ferns and wild gingers that he studied extensively.

Learn about the role of design in a botanical garden, and see how the Blomquist Garden has evolved during the past 50 years.

Finally, explore the role that conservation horticulture plays in a modern botanical garden in the age of largescale habitat destruction, and how efforts are being made in the Blomquist Garden to connect the visitor with the plight of vanishing ecosystems and endangered plants species, many of which were important to Dr. Blomquist and his research.

Special thanks to the Duke University Libraries staff, the Blomquist Garden team and all other contributors who brought this exhibit to life.

Exhibit dates: June 22-Oct. 21, 2018

Public reception: Wednesday, Aug. 29, from 4-5:30 p.m.

Gallery hours: The gallery is open during Perkins Library hours.

Directions: Perkins Library is to the right of Duke Chapel on this map of West Campus. Check out the video below to see how easy it is to walk from the Blomquist Garden to Perkins Library. Thanks to volunteer photographer Cathi Bodine for the video.